The website for Dr Martin Shaw OBE FRCM (1875 –1958)

Britten was obviously influenced by Martin Shaw!

Petet Maxwell, Cramer Music

WATER FOLK

A song sequence in three parts composed for Elgar's last Three Choirs Festival in 1932

CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO LISTEN TO PART ONE

Mosaic of the crown of thorns

FULL SCORE AND PARTS ARE AVAILABLE FROM CRAMER MUSIC

TEXT BY HEINRICH HEINE HERE

 

 

Composed for the Three Choirs Festival, Worcester, 1932, it has three movements: (I) The Stranger, (II) The Meeting, (III) Poseidon (30 mins approx)

Written for the Three Choirs Festival, it had its first performance that year in Worcester. Elgar took a great interest, writing to Shaw to let him know the score had arrived safely from the publishers. Elgar also paid for Shaw to stay at his club in Worcester for the duration of the Festival.

Peter Maxwell of Cramer Music says: "Playing the first movement back of Water Folk “The Stranger” [I saw] that it was like a Britten style or certainly that kind of instrumental combination. Britten was obviously influenced by Martin Shaw! ...I can certainly see this coupled in with a Britten and/or V.W. concert."

Songs from The Airmen: Songs originally published with Cramer on the CD are available to singers as archive copies from trade@cramermusic.co.uk. Cramer published Shaw's songs from 1923 onwards.

 

re-orchestrated

The following three works have been re-orchestrated, and are now available on request:

Sursum Corda, available from Music Sales, was composed in 1933 with words written specially by Laurence Binyon. (15 mins)

Easter, a play for singers: is also available through Music Sales. Inspired by the medieval mystery plays, the play was written in 1929 with words by John Masefield. Set outside Christ's tomb in the early hours of Easter morning it has solo parts for twelve singers ,together with a double choir of angels. (30 mins)

The Changing Year is now available from Stainer and Bell. A secular cantata, written for the Festival of Britain in 1951, it was first performed at Colchester. As with Shaw's oratorio The Redeemer, the words are chosen from the canon of English verse by Shaw's wife, Joan Cobbold. (45 mins).

 

Recording made in 1975 by the Broadheath Singers with the Winsor Sinfonia, conducted by Robert Tucker. Full recording available on request.